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Poetry Classics: Opportunity, By John James Ingalls

Opportunity, it is famously said, knocks only once. John James Ingalls, a U.S. Senator from Kansas, penned an ode to this simple but profound principle in the mid-19th century, and it was said to have become Theodore Roosevelt’s very favorite poem.

The Best Of Us

When something terrible falls a group of people at an office, an unlikely hero steps up to save the day.

The Passenger

Sestina- a poem with six stanzas of six lines and a final triplet, all stanzas having the same six words at the line-ends in six different sequences that follow a fixed pattern, and with all six words appearing in the closing three-line envoi.

Haunted High-Ons Review

Jamie Madrox and Monoxide - collectively known as the horror core rap duo TWIZTID - have carved out a comfortable side-gig for themselves as fake ghost hunters... but what happens when a routine house call yields not only a ghost, but a killer demon to boot? Hijinks and horror, of course!

Poetry Classics: Ode 1.11, By Horace

Made famous by Robin Williams’ inspiring literature teacher in the film Dead Poets Society, Horace’s Ode 1.11 contains one of the most quoted Latin phrases — Carpe diem, or “Seize the day!”

Forgotten Life

They say people only care about you when you die. Sadly, that's often the case.

Shirtless Bear Fighter Review

After being betrayed by the bears that raised him, the legendary SHIRTLESS BEAR-FIGHTER wanders the forest he’s sworn to protect, fist-fighting bears, eating flapjacks and being the angriest man the world has ever known!

Writing Quick Tips: Show, Don’t Tell

Want to become a great writer? Then you're going to need to learn how to paint pictures with your words. This isn't as hard as it sounds, though. Here's some tips to help.

Roadside Flowerbed

We bring back a past feature writer, Ashleigh Hatter, with this incredible poem about the past and how it fades away over time.

Poetry Classics: Mending Wall, By Robert Frost

Robert Frost once told John F. Kennedy that “Poetry and power is the formula for another Augustan Age.” If that is the case, then Frost brought both to bear in this poem about two neighbors rebuilding a fence between their property during a cold winter in New England. A story told in blank verse, Frost critiques the phrase that he attributes to the other man in the story, “Good fences make good neighbors.” Dedicated to neighborliness and good will towards others, Frost’s work is a helpful tonic against 21st century individualism and selfishness. - Via The Art of Manliness