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The Greatest Thief

The police sirens blared in the distance; they would arrive on the scene any minute. Tuck “The Ghost” Kelly—was trapped on the roof of a 20 story office building.

He was dubbed “The Ghost” because nobody had ever seen him. All past records of his existence had vanished. All security footage of him was blurred into a black shapeless figure due to wearing an experimental “vanishing” sheet he invented. He’s stolen from banks, art museums, private estates, online accounts, and various governments from around the world. Tuck is considered enemy number one in most first world countries, but nobody even knows what he looks like. He has been committing robberies for 15 years now, and the only reason the authorities know about him at all is because his own mother gave up his name after he drained her pension to fund his vanishing sheet.

Tonight, though, it all came to an end. The police planted their own as security in the building—an international accounting firm which holds the personal financial records for some of the riches men in the world. They knew Tuck would need to pay off some crooked security personnel in order to infiltrate the locked-down building. What they didn’t know was that Tuck was aware the guys he paid off were cops. Which is why he didn’t show up to the side entrance where they were supposed to meet him to “let” him in. No, while they were at the side entrance, Tuck was already making his way to the top floor. The police still don’t know how he got in.

By the time the rest of the cops got to the building they already had a helicopter shining a spotlight on him. Tuck had set off an alarm which alerted the police, then ran up to the roof. Even now nobody knows what his real plan was. He hadn’t stolen anything from the office. He simply broke in, purposely set off the alarm, went up to the roof and waited until the cops and the helicopter arrived, then jumped off the building.

Tuck “The Ghost” Kelly plummeted 20 stories to his death. He landed head first; completely obliterating his face in the process. The only thing found in his possession at the time of death was a fiery red medallion mashed into crushed hand.

The cops tried to get a photograph of Tuck from his mother, but one didn’t exist. Apparently the family had an unusual religious belief where they refused to get photographed. As far as the modern world was concerned, “The Ghost” was just that. But they did manage to get one single picture. For whatever reason, Tuck had revealed his face to the helicopter just before he jumped to his death. The image, plastered over newspaper and magazine covers worldwide, was of him smiling.

The newspapers called him the greatest thief in human history. If they only knew.

Tuck had become weary over the last few years. There wasn’t anything left for him to steal that would give him the incredible rush he’d grown addicted to. Then he had an idea: his mother had raised him to believe that as long as they never had their pictures taken or images recorded, Death wouldn’t be able to find them. Once a picture was taken, though, it was only a matter of time before he would come for them. She said there would be a moment just before Death took one’s soul that a person could make their peace. Then you would get sent to either heaven or hell through the power of a medallion dangling from the skeletal figure’s neck.

Tuck got his picture taken just before he dove off that building. And sure enough, right before he smashed into the ground time slowed and Death arrived. Instead of making his peace, though, Tuck snatched the eternal being’s medallion which was used to end one’s life and transported their soul to the other side. It was the ultimate score. Essentially, Tuck stole the ability for people to die.

They called him the greatest thief in history. The only man to steal from Death himself.

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