Bloodsuckers

Renee, a struggling model with anorexia is not only plagued by the pressures of the modeling world and her extreme diet, she is also tormented by leeches that keep appearing on her skin. Can she get rid of them before they suck the life out of her?

Poetry Classics: Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night, By Dylan Thomas

Dylan Marlais Thomas, born October 27, 1914, in South Wales, was the archetypal Romantic poet of the popular American imagination—he was flamboyantly theatrical, a heavy drinker, engaged in roaring disputes in public, and read his work aloud with tremendous depth of feeling and a singing Welsh lilt.

Save The Trees

We kick off the Halloween season with this bizarre tale about a tree. But not just any tree. This tree projects a significant fear to anyone brave enough to glance at its grotesque features. Can anyone overcome its menacing presence and get close to it?

Poetry Classics: The Fly, By William Blake

William Blake was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake is now considered a seminal figure in the history of the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age.

Short Story Classics: One Of These Days By Gabriel García Márquez

Gabriel José de la Concordia García Márquez was a Colombian novelist, short-story writer, screenwriter and journalist, known affectionately as Gabo or Gabito throughout Latin America. Considered one of the most significant authors of the 20th century and one of the best in the Spanish language, he was awarded the 1972 Neustadt International Prize for Literature and the 1982 Nobel Prize in Literature.

Poetry Classics: Life, By George Herbert

George Herbert's poetry is among the finest religious verse in the English language. Centring on the Eucharist, it deals with the struggles of a man endeavouring to give himself up to God. Herbert was also an early exponent of concrete poetry with poems such as The Altar and Easter-Wings. William Cowper found great solace in these poems during his periods of depression. They were also read by Charles I whilst in prison.

Poetry Classics: I Heard A Fly Buzz—When I Died, By Emily Dickinson

I heard a Fly buzz” employs all of Dickinson’s formal patterns: trimeter and tetrameter iambic lines (four stresses in the first and third lines of each stanza, three in the second and fourth, a pattern Dickinson follows at her most formal); rhythmic insertion of the long dash to interrupt the meter; and an ABCB rhyme scheme. Interestingly, all the rhymes before the final stanza are half-rhymes (Room/Storm, firm/Room, be/Fly), while only the rhyme in the final stanza is a full rhyme (me/see). Dickinson uses this technique to build tension; a sense of true completion comes only with the speaker’s death.

Short Story Classics: The Skylight Room By O. Henry

The Skylight Room is a short story by author William Sydney Porter under pen name O. Henry. The story is about a young woman, Miss Leeson, and her stay at one of Mrs. Parker's parlours. During her stay, Miss Leeson experiences hard times and is later rescued by a star. The story was published in The Four Million, a collection of short stories by O. Henry that was first published in 1906.

Poetry Classics: If, By Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling [1865-1936] was born in Bombay on December 30th, son of John Lockwood Kipling, an artist and teacher of architectural sculpture and his wife Alice. His mother was one of the talented and beautiful Macdonald sisters, four of whom married remarkable men: Sir Edward Burne-Jones, Sir Edward Poynter, Alfred Baldwin and John Lockwood Kipling himself.

Convoy

Social media has made it easier for us to connect with the world. But it also brings out the worst in people. And somewhere in the middle are those who pretend to care, but don't actually do anything. This poignant piece by Ashleigh Hatter explores these ideas.

Short Story Classics: To Build A Fire, By Jack London

A classic Man versus Nature story set in the Yukon Territory in Northwestern Canada. "The dog did not know anything about thermometers" but it had the sense to know "that it was no time for travelling." A brilliant story to read in the depth of winter when a freezing spell is in the forecast or gripping your region.

Mellany

Lost love can hurt more than we're capable of withstanding. But sometimes that love can return in unexpected ways. And that can hurt even worse.