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Category: Classic Literature

From short stories to poetry, this is where we share some of the best works of classic fiction in history.

Poetry Classics: If, By Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling [1865-1936] was born in Bombay on December 30th, son of John Lockwood Kipling, an artist and teacher of architectural sculpture and his wife Alice. His mother was one of the talented and beautiful Macdonald sisters, four of whom married remarkable men: Sir Edward Burne-Jones, Sir Edward Poynter, Alfred Baldwin and John Lockwood Kipling himself.

Short Story Classics: To Build A Fire, By Jack London

A classic Man versus Nature story set in the Yukon Territory in Northwestern Canada. "The dog did not know anything about thermometers" but it had the sense to know "that it was no time for travelling." A brilliant story to read in the depth of winter when a freezing spell is in the forecast or gripping your region.

Short Story Classics: The Lady, or the Tiger? By Frank Stockton

"The Lady, or the Tiger?" is a much-anthologized short story written by Frank R. Stockton for publication in the magazine The Century in 1882. "The Lady, or the Tiger?" has entered the English language as an allegorical expression, a shorthand indication or signifier, for a problem that is unsolvable.

Short Story Classics: Thank You, M’am, By Langston Hughes

When a young boy named Roger tries to steal the purse of a woman named Luella, he is just looking for money to buy stylish new shoes. After she grabs him by the collar and drags him back to her home, he's sure that he is in deep trouble. Instead, Roger is soon left speechless by her kindness and generosity.

Short Story Classics: Regret, By Kate Chopin

In Regret by Kate Chopin, we have the theme of loss, loneliness, detachment, commitment, love, independence, and responsibility. Taken from her A Night in Acadie collection the story is narrated in the third person by an unnamed narrator.

Short Story Classics: The Gift of the Magi, By O. Henry

Jim has sold his watch in order to buy the combs for Della even as she has sold her hair to buy the watch chain for Jim. Like the Magi, those wise men who invented the tradition of Christmas giving, both Della and Jim have unwisely sacrificed the greatest treasures of their house for each other.