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Category: Classic Poetry

Some say poetry is for the more sensitive types. We don’t believe that. Here you’ll find poems from some of the greatest authors of all time. And trust us, these aren’t you’re typical love poems.

Poetry Classics: Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night, By Dylan Thomas

Dylan Marlais Thomas, born October 27, 1914, in South Wales, was the archetypal Romantic poet of the popular American imagination—he was flamboyantly theatrical, a heavy drinker, engaged in roaring disputes in public, and read his work aloud with tremendous depth of feeling and a singing Welsh lilt.

Poetry Classics: The Fly, By William Blake

William Blake was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake is now considered a seminal figure in the history of the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age.

Poetry Classics: Life, By George Herbert

George Herbert's poetry is among the finest religious verse in the English language. Centring on the Eucharist, it deals with the struggles of a man endeavouring to give himself up to God. Herbert was also an early exponent of concrete poetry with poems such as The Altar and Easter-Wings. William Cowper found great solace in these poems during his periods of depression. They were also read by Charles I whilst in prison.

Poetry Classics: I Heard A Fly Buzz—When I Died, By Emily Dickinson

I heard a Fly buzz” employs all of Dickinson’s formal patterns: trimeter and tetrameter iambic lines (four stresses in the first and third lines of each stanza, three in the second and fourth, a pattern Dickinson follows at her most formal); rhythmic insertion of the long dash to interrupt the meter; and an ABCB rhyme scheme. Interestingly, all the rhymes before the final stanza are half-rhymes (Room/Storm, firm/Room, be/Fly), while only the rhyme in the final stanza is a full rhyme (me/see). Dickinson uses this technique to build tension; a sense of true completion comes only with the speaker’s death.

Poetry Classics: If, By Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling [1865-1936] was born in Bombay on December 30th, son of John Lockwood Kipling, an artist and teacher of architectural sculpture and his wife Alice. His mother was one of the talented and beautiful Macdonald sisters, four of whom married remarkable men: Sir Edward Burne-Jones, Sir Edward Poynter, Alfred Baldwin and John Lockwood Kipling himself.