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Category: Classic Short Stories

If you’re a fan of classic literature you’ll enjoy this section. Here we focus on some of the most famous short stories in history and the lesser known classics. If it’s good, we’ll share it.

Short Story Classics: The Magic Shop By H.G. Wells

The Magic Shop is a curious tale that follows a father and son’s experience of visiting a ‘genuine magic shop’. While the little boy explores the shop, seeing only joy and wonder, his father is confronted with much more sinister visions. Published in 1903

Short Story Classics: One Of These Days By Gabriel García Márquez

Gabriel José de la Concordia García Márquez was a Colombian novelist, short-story writer, screenwriter and journalist, known affectionately as Gabo or Gabito throughout Latin America. Considered one of the most significant authors of the 20th century and one of the best in the Spanish language, he was awarded the 1972 Neustadt International Prize for Literature and the 1982 Nobel Prize in Literature.

Short Story Classics: The Skylight Room By O. Henry

The Skylight Room is a short story by author William Sydney Porter under pen name O. Henry. The story is about a young woman, Miss Leeson, and her stay at one of Mrs. Parker's parlours. During her stay, Miss Leeson experiences hard times and is later rescued by a star. The story was published in The Four Million, a collection of short stories by O. Henry that was first published in 1906.

Short Story Classics: To Build A Fire, By Jack London

A classic Man versus Nature story set in the Yukon Territory in Northwestern Canada. "The dog did not know anything about thermometers" but it had the sense to know "that it was no time for travelling." A brilliant story to read in the depth of winter when a freezing spell is in the forecast or gripping your region.

Short Story Classics: The Lady, or the Tiger? By Frank Stockton

"The Lady, or the Tiger?" is a much-anthologized short story written by Frank R. Stockton for publication in the magazine The Century in 1882. "The Lady, or the Tiger?" has entered the English language as an allegorical expression, a shorthand indication or signifier, for a problem that is unsolvable.

Short Story Classics: Thank You, M’am, By Langston Hughes

When a young boy named Roger tries to steal the purse of a woman named Luella, he is just looking for money to buy stylish new shoes. After she grabs him by the collar and drags him back to her home, he's sure that he is in deep trouble. Instead, Roger is soon left speechless by her kindness and generosity.

Short Story Classics: Regret, By Kate Chopin

In Regret by Kate Chopin, we have the theme of loss, loneliness, detachment, commitment, love, independence, and responsibility. Taken from her A Night in Acadie collection the story is narrated in the third person by an unnamed narrator.

Short Story Classics: The Gift of the Magi, By O. Henry

Jim has sold his watch in order to buy the combs for Della even as she has sold her hair to buy the watch chain for Jim. Like the Magi, those wise men who invented the tradition of Christmas giving, both Della and Jim have unwisely sacrificed the greatest treasures of their house for each other.